Project Incubator: the Support to CSO Incubation Centre for Local Burmese NGOs of Chin State in Myanmar

  • MyanmarCountry
  • The United Nation Democracy Found (UNDEF)Donor
  • ENGLanguage
  • social involvementembracing community NGOscapacity buildingTopics

The Applicant/ Leader (in English)

Agency for Basic Community Development(ABC)

Applicant's email & phone

Email: maungburma@gmail.com, abs.burma@gmail.com 

Tel.: 95-1-636081/09-49341080; +959421122276          

  

Registration & postal address

28(B), Wireless Quarter, Mingaladon Township, Yangon 

Background of the applicant

Agency for Basic Community Development (ABC) was created in Yangon, Myanmar by Maung John in 2009. As a Catholic humanitarian non-profit organization, ABC implemented a community building and civic education project in the Thai-Burma border area where the presence of civil society was prohibited by the junta. ABC continued to work in the conflict stricken Burma-India border for the community building. After four years of its creation, ABC became a registered entity in 2013. Currently, it is working for the promoting and protection of Chin indigenous people, grassroots movement building and strengthening of self-help/self-support groups in Upper Sagaing Region and Chin State. ABC’s projects include: 2009-2010: joint training, seminars, workshops and education; 2011-2012: Psychosocial Support (PSS) to more than 600 vulnerable children of Nargis Cyclone; 2011-2012: community development and civic empowerment training for the Thai-Burma border community; 2011-2013 construction of a jeepable car road in Chin State in order to connect some villages; 2013-14 construction of school toilets for the neediest primary schools in Chin State; vocational training skills for needy orphans. 2014 – onwards: promotion and protection of Burmese migrant workers, especially as far as pre-departure preparation and the anti-human trafficking program are concerned; 2010-2011: Water Sanitation Hygiene (WatSan Project) in Delta; 2011: Community Development and Civic Empowerment in Kalay for Chin CSOs; 2014-2015: Psychosocial Support Services for Chin Orphans in Kalay. The Implementing Agency, consequently, has experience in working for the sake of local communities in remote, isolated areas with little or no internet access (Chin).   

Applicant's website/s or facebook

www.abcmm.org    

Partners & co-applicants involved

Development Policy Foundation (FPR), a Polish non-governmental organization founded in 2010. Its mission is building institutional capacity of rural CSOs/NGOs in remote & outlying areas of NIS, Asia, EaP and MENA, along sharing transformation experience, support sustainable development and encourage local communities when facing challenges of globalized, highly professional, competitive world. It is an implementing institution & idea provider of more than 2 dozen of projects/initiatives, including design of innovatory tools for public consultation (South UKR www.gopriplus.org, www.fixkairouan.org TUN, www.soeasty.org BY); SME support and income diversification in rural areas (Rural Business Incubator BY, www.komarovo.com, TJ Natural Pamiri Products www.gornobadakhshan.org); support to social entrepreneurship (BY www.dominternatsvir.org, TEMI&Lifeline GE); networking for NGO (projectsincubator.org GE, BRD-net UKR/Black Sea). In Moldova FPR implements a project supporting sustainable tourism (on-line tools, bike-routes, small investments) and EU approximation (GIs registration/codrute.org). FPR will be in charge of performing expert activities such as being tutors/supervisors of the Project Incubators, members of the Boards of Trustees, creators of the glossary and a handbook, an e-tool materials, organizers of a study tour to the EU (i.a. Wojciech Szpoci?ski, Sylwia Szparkowska, Aleksandra Piasecka, Lech Siedelnik, Kamil Miklaszewski, Agata Filipek, Miros?awa Tomasik, Marcin Skonieczka)

“Peipsi Center for Transboundary Cooperation” (originally "Lake Peipsi Project") was begun in 1993 as an informal organization whose primary focus was research into environmental issues on the border between Estonia and Russia. Afterwards, the scope of activities expanded to include social action projects aimed at assisting local people in developing skills related to public participation, in order to help them address local issues as a part of the democratic process. Peipsi CTC organizes capacity building trainings for different stakeholder groups on environmental education, fundraising, project management and public relations. They also initiate public dialogues, community events, such as roundtables, local environmental actions and deliberative forums; that support development of the local initiative. Peipsi is experienced in community development projects, e.g.: Surveys regarding the third sector (2003), NGO Support Center (2000- 2004), Tartu Volunteer Center (2000-2002), Raising Capacity of Women's Organizations (2001-2002), Rural Women's Social and Economic Development (2001), Local sustainable development projects in Mustvee and Kallaste (1997-2000), Strengthening EU awareness and increasing accessibility to information among rural youth - a key to regional development (2000). Representative of the Peipsi CTC will be Margit Säre who will play the role of the instructor/tutor of the Incubator during workshops/on-line support programme and a member of the Board of Trustees. Other experts: Ulo Sare, Kadri Tõrva, Lemmi Maasik, Ulla Preeden.

Applicant’s own contribution: Gathering evaluation material and feedback from participants;, gathering evaluation material and feedback from e-learning platform users, gathering evaluation material and feedback about the Centre, establishment of a network of CSO and CBO cooperating within the frames of the Centre; preparation of project proposals under individual supervision /tutoring, workshops, on-line support; expert support for organizations implementing grants, photo/video documentation, conference hall for trainings, coffee breaks during training sessions, Support Centre in Falam will be run in open formula/ free of charge ICT access;

Partner’s in-kind contribution: on-line support of the beneficiaries, gathering evaluation material and feedback from e-learning platform users, gathering evaluation material and feedback about the Centre, , workshops, expert support for organizations implementing grants    

Project Summary

The project is intended to increase the capacity of Burmese local NGOs in Chin State by improving project-related and managerial skills of their staff (esp. young CSO leaders) and in this way enable them to act for and strengthen their local communities. The project also sets up the Project Incubation Centre to support local NGOs to formulate and implement the sub-grant projects. Young people in Chin State CSOs will be main partners for project implementation and they will be assisted by tutors in writing their own project proposals addressing real local problems and implement them. 

Background Outline & Justification

Development issues/ democratic challenges

The social theory and development praxis in Chin State are relatively new as the country was under the oppressive military rule for more than five decades. CSOs were revitalized under the newly formed 2011 government. In Chin State, the poorest area in Myanmar, CSOs started to be set up in response to food insecurity and extreme poverty. Later they took initiative to address the issues of human rights, democracy, federalism and political change. However, network, collaboration and resource sharing are still weak among Chin CSOs. Moreover, they are inexperienced and have an ad-hoc character thus resorting mainly to self-help, self-support. The present emergency situation caused by flood deprived Chin indigenous people of their properties, crops, social capital or even life (2008 & 2010 & 2015). It was a test for the capacity of Chin CSOs working – often trial and error – for the cause of local communities. Many local CSOs need capacity building for their organizations especially in terms of managing their projects, fundraising, and development strategy for reconstruction of post-disaster Chin State. They have to make themselves, their stories and their situation known to potential donors in Yangon and even overseas donors to get support for their community rehabilitation and development. If these CSOs, especially their young leaders, are empowered and strengthened, they will be able to network with other mainland and lowland CSOs for collaboration and resource sharing. With necessary knowledge and management skills, they will effectively serve local communities for poverty reduction, community development, and promotion of democratic principles.

Detailed problem analysis                

The main/focal problems addressed by the project are:

1) Lack of knowledge and skills of local CSO leaders and youth leaders in problem identification and project management. The ABC conducted an evaluation on a representative sample of 40 young CSO/NGO leaders of Chin State in June 2015. It was the most comprehensible and explicit Chin-scoped survey available to date. The situation is dire:

  • only 16% of respondents (young CSO leaders) can name a donor/s offering microgrants to local organizations in Chin/Myanmar;
  • 8% have ever seen a ready donor-oriented project proposal on any topic;
  • 10% (amongst it 80% a courier to send the application) have ever participated in proposal development; 20% have ever participated in project implementation; 
  • 5% have ever submitted the development proposal on behalf of Chin based CSO/CBO;
  • 16% can clearly & concisely describe at least one local problem along with a realistic (financially/sustainable), participatory, community based solution to  it.

These deficits are directly triggered by the underlying causes outlined below (which, coupled with poverty, make 65% of young civil leaders/involved in CSOs/CBOs in Chin willing to leave the area and go to Yangon or abroad for earning their living): as well as the overall underdevelopment of the Myanmar 3rd sector, being severely Yangon centralized, relying on the range of Yangon NGOs intermediaries, acting likewise consultancies, plainly unwilling to share practical knowledge/project know-how. Altogether, it represents the typical early post-authoritarian transition civil sector entanglement (with all its cons and pros). Only very recently (2014, 2015) one single development project was designed (under a genuinely simplified application) and further implemented by the team of Chin youth on behalf of Chin-based CSO activists (via micro granting initiative run by one of the Yangon-based NGO) . The developed micro project was the protection of local water source/spring in Central Chin and it is still judged as a very successful project by the NGO intermediary & int. donor.

2) Lack of institutional capacity of local CSOs and network among CSOs.

This problem is also plain and acute: no semi-/professional staff; the personnel rotation is extremely high due to spontaneous management, improvised and ad-hoc minimal/scarce financing. The gender imbalance of personnel is huge. The local Chin based CSOs have almost no experience in applying and running their own projects, regardless of a topic, scale, scope or donor. The donor requirements in terms of application procedure & compulsory annexes & accounting/reporting standards, even fairly flexible, are incomprehensible, perplexing and all-confusing. The local CSO lack capacities in terms of application and project management know-how: (till now up to 3 (confirmed)/5 (claimed indirectly) applications have been submitted by the local CSOs for external/ Yangon funding. Currently only 1 single donor founded project is run by a Chin-based CSO, although being lucidly political one (emphasizing political integration of the Chin militias). Additionally, 4 community projects (not CSO/CBO/not-competitive basis) were supported by extractive industry: nickel mining comp. within the state. There is no CSO & NGO support infrastructure. The networks & cooperation/ consortia/joint application type coalitions are non-existent as: no need arises, the distorted system of competition lacks incentives to form them, while CSOs depend largely on ad hoc, mostly faith-based financing. Currently only 4 CBOs/ CSOs enjoining partnerships with foreign faith-based donors (mostly from the US): being simple sponsoring-oriented initiatives. There is no topical cooperation, long-term, joint fund-raising effort. The respective PR & communication & dissemination activities are either very weak or they do not exist at all. 

3) Lack of experiences and opportunities for project management and implementation by local Chin CSOs

The two factors outlined above – lack of knowledge and skills in the field of project management and no institutional support - translate into an overall lack of opportunities to initiate socially valuable initiatives. This, in turn, prevent CSO leaders from gaining relevant experience, learning how to apply for funding, practicing news managerial skills and building networks of contacts; and thus the vicious circle closes. Consequently, it is crucial that the project address all the above-mentioned issues: it should build CSO capacity, strengthen their institutional background and, last but not least, allow CSO leaders to put theory into practice in order to give them a genuine insight into the project application and implementation process (learning by doing), encourage to take future actions on their own and in this manner both break the said vicious circle and ensure project sustainability.

Existing/past initiatives

The initiatives worth mentioning are:

  • Chin Institute of Social Science – a newly established (2014) higher-education institution which wants to empower a new generation of Chin youth with a learning environment that fosters civic responsibility, political awareness, self-efficacy, and critical thinking. It offers three-term long Intensive Programmes which focus on language and academic skills along with theoretical foundation, rooted in social sciences and civic education and community work. The proposed project No. UDF-MYA-14-616, on the other hand, concentrates not on acquiring formal qualifications but gaining  practical skills and applying knowledge in action;
  • ActionAid in Myanmar (partly funded by UNDEF) supports local organisations through intensive training and deployment of ‘change-makers’ (youth leaders) in target communities. Change-makers mobilise and organise local communities and facilitate their analysis of community problems, undertake participatory planning, promote democratic norms and forms of decision-making, mobilise community resources (including that of local government), and facilitate the implementation of community prioritised action points; ActionAid in Myanmar, however, did not cover Chin State but focused on the Delta region which boosts an effectively more integrated communities with better access.
  • Comprehensive Development and Local Social Plan' for Chin State (2013/14) – a programme supported by DANIDA and UNICEF, aimed at socio-economic development in Chin State, it included the purchase of 30 computers for schools but the provided internet is poor;
  • Myanmar Peace Support Initiative (MPSI): Chin community moves towards sustainable peace (2013/14), Chin National Front, the project aimed at establishing a long-lasting peace in the country by embracing the will of the people in the peace processes and political dialogues. This was to be done through a series of public consultations across Chin State and Sagaign Division as well as the development of internet infrastructures in 30 high schools in Chin State.

It should be noted that many of the programmes offered in Myanmar were in fact intended to get involved political dissenters and thus pacify them, not to bring tangible results. However, the political situation in Myanmar is changing very rapidly: the Chin National Front entered into ceasefire agreement with the government, while political dissidents joined parties and NGOs so that an overwhelming majority of them got integrated. During the November 2015 elections, numerous and diverse political parties in Chin State united their efforts to ensure influential representation of the region and, as a result, foster its development (consensus-based policy, withdrawal from candidacy to enhance chances of bigger players on the competitive political scene).

ABC has already necessary experience in the project subject-matter area because it has been involved in capacity building for Chin CSOs since 2011. It first conducted “Community Development and Civic Empowerment” training for religious leaders, village headmen, Kale University student leaders and indigenous leaders from Tonzang, Tedim, Falam townships of Chin State and Kale and Tamu townships of Sagaing Division. Since then, ABC has been implementing CSOs strengthening activities in Chin State and Kale-Kabaw, Sagaing region. ABC gives consultations to Chin CSOs for their registration process to Ministry of Home Affairs, Government of Myanmar. A series of capacity building trainings are also conducted for the newly formed and reformed Chin CSOs. Organizational planning system (OPS), organizational development (OD), community organization (CSO) and leadership training for CSO. From the experience gathered/lessons learnt so far by ABC it results that praxis-oriented know-how should be a number-one priority in developing a support programme for Chin inhabitants.

Project location

Chin State

Project Start & End Date:

24 months 

Amount Requested, state the currency

176,000.00 usd

Target groups & final beneficiaries:

The direct beneficiaries of the project are local CSOs in Chin State (3 districts: Hakha, Falam and Mindat; townships of Falam, Hakha, Htantlang, Tedim, Tonzang, Mindat, Matupi, Kanpetlet, Paletwa) which was chosen as the most marginalized and poorest region of Myanmar. (See Attachment 1; Map of Myanmar indicating target districts and townships). There are about fifty civil society organizations (Attachment 2: List of local CSOs) out of which trainees will be recruited (there will be 24 Incubator’s participants selected during the Recruitment Meeting, mostly from registered organisations, though some can also belong to non-formal groups. Since each of the best 12 graduates will have to find 1-2 partners to their project from other CSOs, all the interested organisations can in fact get involved and thus Incubator’s trainees - during their projects implementation - in a practical way will share the acquired knowledge and skills not only with members of their organizations but also other CSOs).

The best 5 graduates of the Incubator trainings will participate in the study tour to Poland and Estonia (together with one IA representative), while the Centre with its infrastructure will be open for all local CSOs. E-learning platform and project materials will also be an open source. The indirect beneficiaries of this project include Chin indigenous community from Hakha, Falam and Mindat because there will be altogether 12 best micro-projects realized by local CSOs as part of the project to the benefit of local community and addressing its needs. In total at least 22 applications (risk consideration: possibility of 2 dropouts) for external funds will be developedwhich may additionally support Chin inhabitants.

Overall objective or goal

To strengthen democracy processes and civil society in the most disadvantaged area in Myanmar.

 

Specific objective(s)

To strengthen the potential of Chin State’s CSOs, providing them with infrastructural base, competence in project management, fundraising skills and network of contacts with other NGOs.

Methodology or project’s strategic approach

Strategic approach             

Building upon the experiences of previous initiatives and their results, it is very practical project (project incubation under bridge support and practical tailored tutoring ???). The project lays emphasis on practical skills that NGO leaders should gain: correct and in-depth need assessment and problem description. The project proposals by CSOs will be drawn up under individual supervision of tutors (learning-by-doing formula) as part of the Project Incubator. The best ideas will be carried out thanks to the scheme of micro-grants, thus allowing participants to put theoretical knowledge into practice. Graduates of the Project Incubation Training will help with the realization of the Cascade Training for local Chin CSOs and Chin community leaders assuring the sustainability of the project.

It is also competitive & inclusive project – only the outstanding proposals will receive microgrants and only the best participants will go on a study tour to Poland and Estonia (although each CSO awarded with a microgrant will invite 1-2 other CSO to cooperate and thus boost the project’s outreach). The competitive character of activities (microgrants and study tour to Europe for the best, remuneration as part of microgrants) will build a strong position and authority of leaders.

Furthermore, the tailored IT technologies will help to overcome the problem the remoteness and isolation of Chin State. The aim of empowering disadvantaged groups will be taken into consideration, too. Those marginalized on account of their language will find a useful glossary of project terms translated into Pawi/Lai (one of the local languages widely spoken in the northern part of Chin state and Kale area). The whole project framework supports organisations and improves their capacity and promotes them as well as enables them to obtain further grants for their activity.

Description of the activities

4. PLANNED OUTPUT/ACTIVITY BY OUTCOME

 

Outcome 1: Project management and fundraising capacity of Chin CSOs and Youth Leaders enhanced (Q1-Q8)

Output 1.1: Recruitment, initiation, delivery of Project Incubation Trainings for 24 young Chin local CSOs leaders (Q1-Q4)

The 10 months’ cycle of Project Incubation Trainings will be conducted in the Chin CSO Centre. The meetings/sessions are scheduled twice a month – preferably during local fairs for the sake of participants’ convenience. This means altogether 20 training sessions. There are 24 participants -  young (<35 years) representatives chosen partly from among existing 50 CSOs in Chin State and partly in an open call. A broad PR action about the recruitment will be carried out: for 2-3 weeks through the network of contacts with Chin CSOs, and the social and local media/pamphlets/banners displayed at the bazaar (the info materials will be translated into Lai/Pawi). Potential candidates should have a communicative command of both written and spoken English.

The recruitment procedure (Q1) consists in each candidate’s describing a local problem which can be solved by means of a small project. The description can be in any form and language (e.g. typed, handwritten or texted - a questionnaire for Android will be made available to facilitate this process). During the Recruitment Meeting approximately 50 potential participants, representing Chin local CSOs/NGOs (list attached herewith) present their early project ideas/problems descriptions in an open forum. The best 24 are selected for the Incubator’s training – the criteria include: the idea’s innovativeness, social involvement, local character, sustainability, support for organization’s potential and, last but not least, take into consideration gender balance. The choice is made by the appointed Board of Trustees (Representatives of the Implementing Agency, Polish/Estonian experts and potential donors). (See Output 2.1. and the management arrangement).

(Q1) Each session will be accompanied by a relevant training manual (altogether 20) on the discussed topic. The manuals will have the form of a booklet with FAQ and answers. Further educational materials will be developed under the –e-platform which will support the whole educational process (Output 1.2).

The Project Incubation Training will comprise 20 training sessions (two-day sessions held twice a month over 10 months; Q1-Q4). The programme of sessions includes the following topics: 1. Kick-off session/Needs assessment 2. Correct identification and description of the problem addressed by the project 3. Overview of common and widely accepted ex ante evaluation methods/needs assessment approaches 4. Introduction to public consultations, community empowerment, strategic planning methods and instruments; 5. Basic economic and social knowledge 6. Various ways of gathering data for the project 7. Data base searching 8. Finding the right donor 9. Best world practices 10. Basic project frame 11. Multiple-purpose project 12. Design and elaboration of the project 13. Basics about project’s budget 14. Further information about planning the budget of the project 15. Sustainability of the project 16. Cross-cutting issues 17. Financial reports 18. Key monitoring and evaluation methods 19. Overview of key project methodology concepts and formulas 20. Consolidation session (See Attachment 3: Tentative Training Program of Project Incubation Training , Output 1.1).

The trainers’ team includes both ABC and Polish experts - on account of the deficit of knowledge and authorities in Burma it seems justified involve foreign experts; besides, it will boost the motivation of both ABC trainers and participants. 2  visits/2 people per visit – depending upon the projects’ needs – are expected: at the very beginning of the cycle (recruitment meeting), at the start-up event: both are connected with Board of Trustees meetings).

Moreover, throughout the whole project beneficiaries can receive on-line support in writing their project proposals/implementing micro-projects by ABC, FPR and PEIPSI experts (Q1-Q8). As a result, it is assumed that at least 22 project proposals (risk consideration – possibility of up to 2 dropouts accounted for) will be developed under individual supervisions during the training (Outcome 3).

Monitoring: Gathering evaluation/monitoring info and feedback from participants.

Output 1.2: Establishment, content development and update of a widely-available e-learning platform & production of in-prints of its essential e-content: handbooks & glossaries (Q1-Q8)

The e-learning platform will support training during Incubator’s training (Q1-Q4) and it will be its integral part (Output 1.1), even though a separate output, and will serve the Centre to post updated information for local CSOs interested in finding calls and developing their project proposals (Output 2.1). It will be created at the very beginning of the project (Q1), promoted in social media and expanded throughout the Incubator’s training cycle (Q1-Q4) and updated during the whole project implementation by the Centre’s team, ABC and PL/EE partners (Q1-Q8). As a tool allowing blended/hybrid learning, the platform will not only increase the effectiveness of training, but also make it more flexible, which is particularly important for mothers, or the disabled. The platform’s content will be automatically updated in the event of internet access (e.g. while visiting the Centre for sessions) but it can be used offline so that trainees can work on it between sessions even if they do not have internet connection in their villages. All the materials posted on the website will be an open source, so that everyone interested, not only the Incubator’s trainees, can have access to them and use them freely.

As far as its contents are concerned, the platform will comprise: (i) handbook with the 10 examples of real/successful  projects with hyperlinks to the glossaries – see point ii; produced by the partners; online (ii) 2 glossaries (EN and Pawi/Lai): explanations of key project-related and social/economic/rural dev. terms and concepts; prepared by the partners and translated by the Centre’s team; edited and printed; (iii) handbook on project design, proposal development, partnership building and project management; prepared by the partners  and translated into Pawi/Lai by the Centre’s team; edited and printed, (iv) virtual map of Chin State, drawn up on the basis of need assessment performed during Incubator’s sessions, for the reference of potential donors; on-line (v) grants search engine: info about granting opportunities (grants, calls, invitations, contents, awards, CSR actions, scholarships, CB event, fellowships, partners requests for Chin-based CSOs (prime focus) and all stakeholders e.g. schools, LAs/regional authorities, other private and public institutions; on-line only + RSS on the project website/RSS; (vi) Chin CSOs profiles for finding networking partners, online; (vii) 20 training manuals (Output 1.1)

Monitoring includes: mid and final evaluation reports incl., feedback from users.

Output 1.3: 10-day Study Tour to Poland and Estonia for 5 CSOs leaders and representative of ABC/IA  (Q4-Q5)

A 10-day-long Study Tour to Poland and Estonia for the best 5 Project Incubation Trainings graduates, rep. 5 CSOs from Chin and 1 ABC/IA representative, acts as an encouragement and scope relevant know-how booster for the graduates (Output 1.1). The participants will be selected amongst graduates of the Project’s Incubation Trainings by the Board of Trustees during the Start-up Event. The Board of Trustees will choose the best, most innovatory but realistic, proposals, evaluate the candidate’s engagement for the represented CSO and his/her personal background, ensuring gender balance.

Poland and Estonia are countries which successfully underwent the process of political and market transformation (including its rural areas), thus becoming synonyms of peaceful transformation in Europe, the challenge that is now in Myanmar. What a Chin young CSOs leader needs is a quality change of perspective on non-metropolitan development: moving from the narrow-scope, played-out natural resources reliant model (mineral, exotic timber logging, unprocessed staple food export e.g. low quality paddle rice production, hardly profitable due to natural conditions and old, ineffective rice breeds, but contributing to creeping erosion), to an inclusive, sustainable, diversified formula of social and economic development: investing in education, effectively addressing complex social problems (e.g. domestic violence, unemployment of youth, intoxication, damage to environment by mining industry), securing more added value (developing local services, micro-processing powers), thus empowering the marginalized. These development recipes largely draw on community solutions (frequently driven by CSOs), individual micro-initiatives (e.g. social entrepreneurship), under various forms of groupings (e.g. cooperatives /producers groups), partnerships (including cross-sectoral, with CSOs engaging in provision of certain public services) and collaboration modalities between them (requiring trust and know-how). These are models still unknown to Myanmar. The study tour for Chin young CSOs leaders stands a unique opportunity to draw on Europe’s first-hand experience (e.g. there is no better way to encourage cooperation, than see others entering into mutually profitable partnership e.g. integrated community rural tourism products/local products processing & sales), practical know-how and lessons learnt. As such the tour will contribute to building the position of young leaders, directly enhancing the respective CSOs, their positions within he organizations and strengthening young leaders’ authority in local environment.

The programme will be adjusted to the expectations and subject matter of the project (Output 3.1) by the participants and will reflect the best practices realized in rural and non-metropolitan areas in both countries as regards topics chosen by young leaders (e.g. social entrepreneurship, care of the disabled, fight against domestic violence, internet access, ecology incl. alternative sources of energy, disaster management, tourism and agriculture). The emphasis will be placed on informal learning: meetings with Polish & Estonian (most of them speak ENG) counterparts (young rural leaders of NGOs/CSOs/social entrepreneurs: the agents of change), on-spot visits to local institutions/projects, further networking eyeing future joint initiatives (e.g. Myanmar was recently included as a priority country under PL development aid). The framework study tour programme is enclosed to the current PD as Attachment 4. The 5 Incubator graduates will use the lesson learnt during the study tour in the implementation of their microgrants/projects and during the Cascade Trainings: project workshops for other CSOs (Output 1.4) and meetings within the open door program (Output 2.2) They will also be a core of the Centre’s team for the following 3 years, organising its activities and the experience overseas will not only give them fresh ideas and motivation for this involvement but also strengthen their position as authorities in local community (Output 2.1).

Consolidation, monitoring and evaluation of the study tour will consist in collecting feedback from participants under the consolidation session with remaining Project Incubation Trainings graduates, CSOs and further local project stakeholders, held in conjunction with: Bridge Support for graduates (Output 3.1) and Open Door Programme of the Chin CSO Centre (Output 2.2)

Output 1.4: Cascade Trainings for local Chin CSOs as well as Chin community leaders by 12 Project Incubation Trainings graduates (Q4-Q8)

The Cascade Trainings on needs assessment, fundraising & project development/management, employing up-to-date methodological approaches and know-how on rural and remote areas development, will be conducted by 12 best, micro-grant awarded Project Incubation Trainings graduates (Output 1.1), targeting other Chin CSOs/NGOs and further Chin community leaders (teachers, doctors, entrepreneurs, leaders of informal groups etc., representing various public and private institutions). Graduates and IA will identify and choose CSOs/CBOs and the community leaders who will participate in the Cascade Trainings.

Each of 12 graduates of Project Incubation Trainings awarded with the microgrant will deliver 2 workshop sessions: so in total 24 workshops sessions will be held. The technical (Output 2.1) and educational resources, including the e-tool (Output 1.2), materials (training manuals - Output 1.1) developed within the project as well as the Study Tour, will be adapted and then employed when delivering the Cascade Trainings. In the course of this undertaking the graduates will have an opportunity to provide a hands-on tutoring for their peers and thus teach them, in a practical way, what they have themselves learnt.

The Cascade Trainings serve two main aims: to multiply the know-how transferred under Project Incubation Training, expanding impact and reaching other Chin CSOs/NGOs and community leaders, enhancing their fundraising and project management skills, in parallel consolidating and enhancing the graduates’ skills and authority, as local leaders.

Finally, the feedback from the participants and graduates conducting trainings will be gathered.

 

Outcome 2: CSO Institutional Capacity developed and enhanced (Q1-Q8)

 

Output 2.1: Establishment and running of the Chin CSO Centre (Q1-Q8)

To support local CSOs, the Chin CSO Centre will be established in Falam: ABC disposes of a shared-space from the Youth Center (YCF). This Youth Center is located in the Falam downtown. It has a 20’x20’ office room and a 20’x50’ training hall. The premises need refitting (windows, toilets) and adaptation, as well as supplementary equipment to deliver the trainings for 24 CSOs representatives and other project activities (Outputs 1.1; 1.2; 1.4; 2.2, 3.1 and more): CTI (computers to be used by the trainees, projector, multifunctional printer for the lectures/ manuals printing), communication equipment (e.g. VOIP, router to provide the Internet) and conference/workshop furniture (tables, chairs) will be installed.

The Chin CSO Centre will have 3 main functions:

1) Resource hub (online and physical): information on donors and upcoming calls, on-going and past projects, match-making between donors and Chin CSOs and in-between them (E-learning platform, providing relevant info and on-line and off-line handbooks and manuals - Output 1.1., including handbooks and glossaries in Chin languages). The educational and informative pamphlets will be translated, printed and make available as part of this activity.

2) Training functions: providing workshops (Output 1.1) and other training sessions to CSOs members and community leaders;

3) Space for gatherings and collaboration: hosting the network, offering access to internet, space for discussion/events, joint project development and its implementation.

The Centre will make available its technical infrastructure and provide support for: the partnership networked CSOs’ initiatives under Open Door Programme (Output 2.2.), voluntary work and other educational and social actions addressed to the Chin communities (e.g. promoting democracy education, small business development, women empowerment, computer and linguistic classes for the children, depending on the CSO profile), as local CSOs’ are lacking of even basic resources.

The established Board of Trustees of Chin CSO Centre (Q1), consisting of the representatives of IA/ABC, the partners and donors’ operating in Chin will take the milestone decisions i.e. on acceptance to Project Incubation Trainings programme (Output 1.1), on micro-grants’ award (Output 3.1), on the study tour participants list (Output 1.3.) and further provide the general guidance, publicity and support to the Centre, during the project and beyond.

 

Monitoring and evaluation: project documentation, media, evaluation report.

 

Output 2.2: Establishment of a local CSO Network of up to 50 Chin leaders

 

The network will be built during the Start-up Event  (Output 3.1). The CSOs in charge of the developed applications will have to find 1-2 partners from among other CSOs (their representatives will be invited for the Start-up Event) to support them, thus not only fostering partnerships and starting cooperation on joint projects’ implementation (Output 3.1) but also building application consortia, elaborating joint project applications, joint problems solutions and a cooperation potential – both local and international (multiplication effect – additional 12-24 CSOs get a practical insight into project management and learn by doing).

Fundraising Backing and on-Demand Assistance - The Centre team (including fundraising expert) will help to match organisations in search of project partners, provide information about potential calls, lists of donors, CSOs profiles and other useful resources for organizations. The team will review the prepared projects and provide advice about the proposal design. The on-line platform (Output 1.3) will keep CSOs updated about the funding opportunities, training opportunities and collaborative networking information (Q1-Q8).

Open Door Programme: partnerships and networking support - The partnership and networking support will be provided under the Open Door Program: being a series of 22 mentored and moderated meetings (approx.  one per month), in a round table, democratic and informal formula involving: the local CSOs, the local community leaders (representing various institutions) to exchange the experience, share problems, gather know-how and update the needs of the Chin communities (due to fast economic and political changes in the country), searching for the join solutions (via CSOs’ network: Output 2.2.), including via joint, partnership/consortia projects. The elaborated formula will be prolonged after the end of the project. The Open Door Programme Officer will be in charge of moderation of consolidation meetings (get-together formula) in the Chin State CSO Incubation Centre.

Monitoring: media; mid and final evaluation reports.

Outcome 3: Social Initiatives implemented in Chin State

 

Output 3.1: 12 Microgrants for CSO led social initiatives (Q4-8)

The 12 microgrants for the best micro-proposals will be awarded by the Chin CSO Centre upon the completion of Project Incubation Trainings, being its pinnacle. Within the Incubator, there will be at least 22 applications (risk consideration: possibility of 2 dropouts) drawn up under individual supervision (tutoring, workshops, on-line support: Q1-Q4) under the Project Incubation Trainings (Output 1.1) which - based on local needs analysis - will directly address real Chin problems.

After the final session of Project Incubation Trainings the Start-up Event will be organized (Q4) in which participants will publicly present their project proposals to the Board of Trustees and other invited Chin CSOs, rep. of LAs/regional authorities, local and regional and national stakeholders & institutions, both public and private, including: e.g. schools/colleges (important drivers of local change), public dev. focused intuitions as well as int./national donors. The Start-up Event will be preceded with a PR action about the event. The best 12 proposals (chosen by the Board - micro-Projects which enhance CSO’s capacity and public outreach, being outright sustainable and directly community beneficial, will preferred) receive microgrants of 1000 USD each and can be implemented. The start-up event gathers also representatives of other Chin CSOs so that CSOs which developed proposals can find partners to their projects and build consortia by inviting 1-2 other partners to cooperate (Output 2.2).

The CSOs (and young leaders as its coordinators) implementing microgrants will be provided with expert support of microgrant merit-related consultants (including international consultants) in matters related to the project topic (e.g. social entrepreneurship, local development, children with special needs, intoxication, domestic violence, single mothers’ empowerment, migrants’ orphans etc.) as well as the 12-month Bridge Support: a flexible, permanent, with on duty modalities, support facility for the microgrants management and implementation teams and organizations (including on accountancy and reporting). The Chin CSOs lack any practical experience in that field.

The implementation of the microgrants builds the CSOs capacity and prestige within the local communities, promotes democratization and social engagement in the region (emboldening the CSOs as providers of real, practical answers to crucial local problems).

The microgrants financed projects will be implemented in the second year (Q4-Q7)

 

Output 3.2: Final Conference & Final Report (Q8)

The final conference will summarize the results of the project, particularly the outcomes of 12 microgrants and the Incubation Centre’s achievements, including the strategy how to continue the Centre’s activity and the network of CSOs. The project materials (handbook, glossaries, pamphlets) will be promoted, esp. the Final Lessons Learnt Report. The potential donors and all the beneficiaries (including those not awarded with grants and those who have participated in the Cascade Trainings) will be invited - approx. 50 participants. PR and dissemination.

Final Lessons Learnt Report – The Lessons Learnt during the microproject preparation (incl. need analysis of the CSO and local community) and microgrants implementation will be collected, analysed, grouped and presented. The recommendations for future implementation of similar project in Burma, esp. Chin region, will be made. The Report will be published on the project website in English, in an open-source formula and presented during the Final Conference.

Evaluation material and feedback from participants: Final evaluation reports incl. surveys; www/app/e-tool; Feedback from CSOs/CBOs; centre documentation. PR materials. Media.

Project Management: roles responsibilities of the applicant and the partner/s:

The Project Management Team

 

Project Manager (Thuan Lian Bil) (50%) will be responsible for the overall management of the project and its activities; and relevant follow-up; Coordination and supervision of a correct, on-time, consistent with the Project Agreement, both merit and financial, administration and implementation of the Project and its settlement, remaining in permanent contact with UNDEF, all project's partners, associates and stakeholder and further networking; Problems shooting when they arise. It’s situated in Chin State.

Assistant Coordinator (Cin Khen Pau) (50%) – local person from Chin State who will support Yangon-based Project Manager in all activities, lend administrative support of all activities of the project. a person in charge of running the Centre and its activities

Accountant (25%) (Thang Suan Mung) - Financial management, up-dated financial reports on all project expenses.

The Agency for Basic Community Development will be responsible for contracts with any Implementing Partner(s) or individuals involved in the project. The Agency for Basic Community Development will be responsible for managing any financial disbursements to the Implementing Partner(s) or individuals as per implementation arrangements or payment schedules concluded between them. UNDEF does not consider that it has any formal relationship with project partners. All such payment arrangements need to be noted in the project document at the outset of the project.

The Agency for Basic Community Development has provided UNDEF with written confirmation from the Development Policy Foundation and Peipsi Center for Transboundary Cooperation stating that the Development Policy Foundation and Peipsi Center for Transboundary Cooperation understand and concur with the roles and responsibilities allocated to them within the project, and agree to assume these roles and responsibilities. The Agency for Basic Community Development will also be responsible for obtaining the signature of each sub-grantee on the Legal Commitments (Annex IV).

The project management takes into account such factors as:

  • Accessibility and region’s specific character (money for transport of event’s participants/accommodation; the location of the Centre is convenient, in a transit town in Chin state.
  • costs of satellite internet in spite of its relatively high costs of use
  • use of local languages
  • poor internet connection - IT tools have an offline option, automatically find WI-FI and download updates; participant get easy electronic devices to use the applications and the platform.

Risks & risk-mitigation measures

Description of Risk

Output

Perceived

(low, medium or high)

Proposed risk-mitigation measures

Failure to secure participation of some stakeholders

Output 1.2, 2.2

Low

Grantee will use its network to secure participation of stakeholders (NGOs, platforms, open recruitment)

Not all participants meet all criteria (e.g. gender considerations)

Output 1.2

Medium

Wider search; look for more informants and/or national Contact Points in the region; activate the network to recruit participants.

Some participants may drop out of the project during its implementation

Output 1.1, 1.2, 3.1

Medium

System of incentives (microgrants, study tour); risk counted in – at least 22 applications are to be finished (while there will be 24 Incubator participants)

Difficulty to mobilize communities during religious celebrations / national holidays

Output 1.1., 1.2, 2.2., 3.1

High

Project timeline is taking into account that activities in Myanmar is slowing down.  Tutaj trzeba doda?, ?e w?a?nie w czasie ?wiat b?dziemy robi? spotkania, wykorzystuj?c ?wi?ta – nie wiem, jak to sformu?owa? EN

Difficulty to access certain area of the country due to inclement weather / rain season / state of the roads

Output 1.1., 1.2, 2.2., 3.1

High

Project timeline takes this aspect into account and the project will be implemented in the area mostly accessible during the whole year. Plan pracy jest flexible

No internet access outside the Centre

Output 1.3, 3.1

High

Development of an on-line/off-line application so that works can be carried out outside the Centre

Poor quality of the micro-grant proposals

Output 3.1

High

The ongoing support from the experienced tutors and their extensive knowledge of the subject should help in developing the participants’ projects of a good quality (bridge support+ Open Door Programme/Center itself). There is also a system of incentives to motivate participants (microgrants and study tour for the best)

Project sustainability

The project formula guarantees its sustainable results, i.e. the Centre has the necessary equipment (computers, internet) for its further functioning. Moreover, there are qualified Incubator graduates who are required further to support the Centre. They will lead workshops/provide tutoring during the Cascade Training and can use the Centre’s premises to give instruction to other CSOs. This means that graduates (in total 24 people), especially the best ones – participants in the study tour of Poland and Estonia (5 graduates) - will support the Centre’s activity, share their knowledge and experience, and give advice for other organisations and young people.

The Implementing Agency will also seek additional funds to expand the Centre’s activity and ensure its sustainability. The proposals developed as part of the project and afterwards by the Incubator graduates including 12 microprojects co-financed by the Centre will exert influence on the whole area under consideration in 9 townships in 3 districts. This is due to the fact that not only will participants bring their knowledge and skills to their mother CSOs but they will also win microgrants for the projects important to their local communities, addressing their particular problems. They will also have qualifications to properly assess other local needs, find a donor, apply for external funds and, finally, successfully manage the project.

Cross-cutting issues & project & added-value & gender & environmental & PWDs & innovation employed

The majority of Chin society is patriarchal and women per default have no public voice, rights to inheritance or land ownership. At the same time women outnumber men who more frequently migrate from the region, yet statistics say that the overall unemployment rate in Burma is 5.2% but this figure rockets in case of young women (15-24 years: almost 13% against 10% in case of young men). Gender considerations are taken into account in the project design: an equal number of male and female participants of the Project Incubator will be ensured. As the project focuses on the age group of up to 35 years, women eligible for participation are often mothers. They will be encouraged to participate in the project by a flexible programme of online support, on- and off-line application which will allow them to work on the proposal at their leisure. The project empowers those who are likely to face adverse situation on the labour market by offering them a unique vocational training.

Furthermore, the project directly addresses the needs of the marginalized because its beneficiaries are indigenous inhabitants of Chin State, the poorest region of Myanmar (poverty rate – 73%) – the least developed country in South Asia. They suffer from forced Burmanisation (i.e. Bamar Buddhist nationalist ideology promoted by the junta since 1962 which claims Myanmar as a “Buddhist State”; it is assimilating the country’s diverse cultures, religions and ethnicities into Bamar culture, Buddhist religion and Bamar ethnicity. As a mix form of religious fundamentalism and ethnocentric nationalism, it attempts to discriminate other faiths, cultures and ethnicities by promoting Bamar race, Bamar culture and Buddhist religion) and other forms of discrimination (human rights abuse, religious persecution, ethnic cleansing, social discrimination). The project aims to satisfy the local needs of Chin NGOs while young people will acquire valuable skills on the job market. Educational materials will be translated into Pawi/Lai (local languages) to address the needs of those marginalized because of their language.

PR & dissemination & visibility & branding

The implementing agency commits to featuring the project and naming UNDEF as a donor in all outreach materials associated with the UNDEF-funded project, including banners, signs, written materials and publications, as well as on its website.

To conform to UNDEF visibility guidelines, the implementing agency will post an announcement on its website home page at the beginning of the project stating that implementing agency has launched a new project named "[insert the title of the project]", funded by The United Nations Democracy Fund. The announcement should include a brief description of the project which:

  • is posted prominently on a page easy to find (such as under "Donors" or "Projects" or "Programmes")
  • features a brief summary of one or two paragraphs describing the project, not just the name of the project;
  • includes the UNDEF logo;
  • includes a photograph of a group activity, scene or scenery related to the project theme/location or for new projects that do not yet have photos of project activities, a photo of your team, or of the one of the places/towns where the project will operate.

All material prepared by the project might be used by UNDEF for the purpose of supporting the development of new initiatives. The grantee agrees that this material might be posted on the UNDEF website as examples.

Project monitoring & evaluation

a) Monitoring

The Implementing Agency undertakes to monitor all project activities and outputs. The Implementing Agency also commits to monitoring the results, outcomes, and impacts of the project. The focal point for monitoring will be John Maung, Director of ABC.

Project monitoring & evaluation (subject-matter/along the project cycle & financial, cost effectiveness) will be done on a permanent basis, throughout a life span of the project.

Monitoring and evaluation related activities will strictly observe and follow requirements and recommendations of PROJECT MONITORING, REPORTING, REVISION AND EXTENSION GUIDELINES for 9th UNDEF Round as well as the commonly accepted international dev. monitoring and evaluation best practices and know-how for projects in remote and fragile environment. The monitoring will be ensured via due control of the indicators set in the Result Based Framework with the current Project Document. 2 Milestone Verification Reports are to be developed, endorsed and submitted to UNDEF, along 2 Milestone Financial Utilization Reports (Miles-stones: 2 & 3), accordingly; The following monitoring outputs are envisaged: i) Mid-Term Report, ii) Final Narrative Report and iii) Final Financial Utilization Reports. As indicated under the Results Frameworks monitoring and evaluation will draw on various, both quantitative and qualitative data (collected by the IA), along a bunch of proactive & engaging and ICT based monitoring tools (employing project's outputs e.g. e-tool) and data collection approaches, enriched with the secondary/independent/media/research/donor data gathering, screening and analysis. The monitoring & evaluation of project will be effectuated by Data Collection Monitoring (& support Audit) Manager, placed in Falam, within the Centre.

UNDEF will appoint an observer to monitor project milestones 2 and 3. This person or entity will bear no responsibility for any aspect of implementation of the project. For this purpose, the Implementing Agency will submit to UNDEF, two months in advance, detailed information on the milestone (date, venue, event title, agenda) so that UNDEF can arrange the monitoring visit. The Implementing Agency will do everything possible to assist and cooperate with the UNDEF-appointed observer. There is a statement under the Legal Commitments (Annex IV) to this effect.

b) Narrative and Financial Reporting

 

It is the Implementing Agency’s responsibility to meet all UNDEF reporting requirements. The point of contact within the Implementing Agency responsible for submitting all reports to UNDEF John Maung, Director of ABC. The Implementing Agency will submit a Mid-Term Progress Report, a Final Narrative Report, audited financial reports, and other reports as may be notified by UNDEF. These reports will be in the required UNDEF template, either in English or French, the official working languages of the UN Secretariat. The Implementing Agency is responsible for reading and following UNDEF’s 9th Round Monitoring and Reporting Guidelines, available on UNDEF’s website.

Three (3) financial reports, certified by an independent auditor, will be submitted to UNDEF during the project implementation period: after milestone 2, after milestone 3, and finally at the end of the project. All reports will be submitted in the required UNDEF format. The financial reports will reflect the amount spent to date. Auditing and certification costs for the three required financial reports during the project period are included in the project budget. The external, independent entity responsible for financial auditing and certification of reports is Mr. Win Thin (Win Thin & Associates and Win Consulting Limited (Room 2B/2C, 1st Flr., Rose Condominium, No.182/194, Botahtaung Pagoda Road Pazundaung Township, Yangon MYANMAR) (Annex V)

 

c) Evaluation

UNDEF is responsible for devising the final project evaluation modality, and will inform the Implementing Agency if a project evaluation is to be conducted. The Implementing Agency is required to take all necessary measures to facilitate evaluation as and when required by UNDEF or its designated third party. Should an evaluation be conducted, the final evaluation report will be published on the UNDEF website.

10% of the total grant amount (up to a maximum of US$ 25,000) will be retained by UNDEF to pay for external monitoring and evaluation costs. This amount will not be disbursed to the Implementing Agency.

Project’s schedule or indicative action plans

1.2 WORK PLAN

Outputs

Key Activities

Mile­stone

Timeframe
(2 years – 8 quarters)

Responsible Party

Budget per output (rounded to the nearest $500)

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

Q5

Q6

Q7

Q8

Outputs for Outcome 1: Project management and fundraising capacity of CSO and Youth Leaders enhanced  (Q1-Q8)

1.1. Recruitment, initiation, delivery of Project Incubation Trainings for 24 young Chin local CSOs leaders (Q1-Q4) and micro-grants award

1.1.1 Running broad PR action: public spaces/internet info PR: dev. of info materials, banners, pamphlets; Translation of info materials into Lai/Pawi

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABC

840

1.1.2 Launching and running targeted recruitment campaign: internet and offline and via IA’s network (2-3 weeks): solicitation of gender equitable submissions;

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABC

     500

1.1.3 Holding Recruitment Meeting along needs assessment: 50 young leaders’ rep of Chin CSOs: selection of 24 young leader rep. Chin CSOs; By the Board of Trustees (from output 2.1);

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABC, FPR, PEIPSI

9160

1.1.4 Designing and elaborating of the training materials: 20 training manuals; Further educational mat dev under e-platform platform (output 1.2);

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABC, FPR, PEIPSI

6000

1.1.5 Conducting 10 month cycle of Project Incubation Trainings for 24 young leader rep. Chin CSOs: delivery of 20 training sessions of 2 days each, during 10 months; Including on-line component;

M2

x

x

x

x

 

 

 

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

 23900

1.1.6. Gathering evaluation/monitoring info and feedback from participants;

M3

x

x

x

x

 

 

 

ABC

Contrib. to the project

1.2. Establishment, content development and update of a widely-available e-learning platform & production of in-prints of its essential e-content: handbooks & glossaries (Q1-Q8)

1.2.1 IT development of the e-platform infrastructure & graphics

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Implementing agency: ABC

    5050

1.2.2. Developing and updating of e-platform’ content. Grants search engine / gathering the information for the database of available grants and funding opportunities.

Key sections:  RSS+on-line algorithm based e-tool / grants search engine. Additionally, all training manuals & materials from 1.1 and 1.2. uploaded; Online; 

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

partners: FPR, PEIPSI

2000

1.2.3. Dev of 2x Glossaries: project terms & basic social/economic/ ecologic/rural dev. terms and concepts; TB edited

M2

x

x

x

x

 

 

 

 

Partners: FPR, PEIPSI

1800

1.2.4. Dev of a Handbook: project design & proposal development & partnership building/nurturing & project management; TB edited/printed; Dev of Handbook containing examples of real/successful 10 dev. project descriptions with hyperlinks to the glossaries below; TB edited/printed;

M2

 

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

ABC, FPR, PEIPSI

2600

1.2.5 Translations of: glossary and handbook into Pawi/Lai;

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC

2000

1.2.6 Providing PR for the e-learning platform and its features & content (related to output 3.2.3)

M3

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

4800

1.2.7 Gathering evaluation & monitoring materials/content and feedback from the users;

M3

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

Contrib. to the project

1.2.8. IT maintenance and support to the users

M3

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

2400

Output 1.3: 10-day Study Tour to Poland and Estonia for 5 CSOs leaders and rep. of ABC/IA (Q 4-Q5)

1.3.1. Selection of 5 participants from amongst graduates of Project’s Incubations Trainings awarded with the micro-grant (Output 1.1.9)

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

Contrib. to the project

1.3.2 Adjustment and adaptation of tour’s agenda in line with participants’ needs and expectations

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

Contrib. to the project

1.3.3 Organizational arrangements for the participants (eg. visas);

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC

600

1.3.4 10 days’ study-tour to PL& EST for 5 best representatives of young Chin based CSOs & 1 rep. of IA, including at least 20 needs tailored on-site visits/seminars/meetings/individual consultations

M3

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

17900

1.3.5 Consolidation & monitoring & evaluation of the study tour: collection of feedback from participants

M3

 

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

ABC

Contrib. to the project

Output 1.4: Cascade Trainings for local Chin CSOs as well as the Chin community leaders by 12 Project Incubation Trainings graduates (Q4-Q8)

1.4.1. Identify the target CSOs/CBOs and the community leaders to be involved under the cascade: done jointly by graduates and IA, based on local insight, network and previous project’s activities

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

Contrib. to the project

1.4.2 Adaptation and adjustment of training manuals from (output 1.1.) and educational resources (from output 1.2) for the cascade trainings

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

Contrib. to the project

1.4.3 Conduct 24 fundraising and project management workshops by 12 graduates

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

2400

1.4.4 Gathering feedback from the participants and graduates conducting trainings

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

Contrib. to the project

Outputs for outcome 2. CSO Institutional Capacity developed and enhanced (Q1-Q8)

 

 

 

Output 2.1.: Establishment and running of the Chin CSO Centre (Q1-Q8)

2.1.1. Purchasing of project equipment and refurbishment of the Centre

M1

x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABC

11680

2.1.2. Translation and printing of the pamphlets: educational and informative materials

M2

 

 

x

x

 

 

 

 

ABC

690

2.1.3. Monitoring and evaluation

M1

x

x

x

x

 

 

 

 


ABC

Contrib, to the project

Output 2.2.: Establishment of a local CSO Network of up to 50 Chin leaders

2.2.1. Fundraising Backing and on-Demand Assistance

M3

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

4800

2.2.2. Open Door Programme: partnership and networking support

M3

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

3300

2.1.3. Monitoring and evaluation

M3

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x


ABC

Contrib, to the project

Outputs for outcome 3: Social Initiatives implemented in Chin State (Q4-Q7)

Output 3.1: 12 Micro grants for CSO led social initiatives (Q4-8)

3.1.1. Selection of the best 12 projects elaborated within the trainings (output 1.1.) by the Board of Trusties to be awarded with a grant

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

ABC, FPR, PEIPSI

Contrib. to the project

3.1.2. Start-up event: Public presentation of the awarded projects. Press conference and PR action

M2

 

 

 

x

 

 

 

 

 ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

9100

3.1.3. Implementation of the best 12 micro projects by CSOs (1000 USD each)

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

 

ABC

12000

3.1.4. Bridge support for the grantees:  permanent support and mentoring and demand-driven facility: management & financial & settlements

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

7800

3.1.5. Support of merit consultants: need tailored assistance for implemented projects

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

PEIPSI, FPR

4200

3.1.6. Extended monitoring and evaluation and collection of feedback and materials from the grantees and their beneficiaries (related to output 3.2. and 2.2.)

M3

 

 

 

x

x

x

x

x

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

Contrib. to the project

Output 3.2. Final Conference & Final Report (Q8)

 

3.2.1. Final conference for approx. 50 participants

M3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

ABC

1280

3.2.2. Final Lessons Learnt Report: educational program and implementing micro grants lessons learnt

M3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

x

ABC, PEIPSI, FPR

1400

3.2.3. PR, press conference, dissemination (related to output 1.2.6.)

M3

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

Contrib. to the project

4. Management and administration

4.1. Project professional and administrative staff (project manager, accountant, assistant coordinator)

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

12240

4.2. Rent and office related costs (bank charges, Internet charges, office supplies, electricity)

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

5040

4.3. Audit

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

ABC

2000

4.4.Bank fees on transfers from UN

x

x

x

ABC

120

Budget

The budget per output is provided in the Results Framework (Annex I). The detailed project budget is attached as Annex II. Please note that changes to this approved project budget require prior UNDEF approval. Financial reallocations made without prior UNDEF approval will not be accepted, and the funds may have to be reimbursed to UNDEF.

Total Project Cost: US $160,000

M&E Cost: US $16,000

Total UNDEF Grant: US $176,000

8. Milestones and Disbursement Schedule                                          

 

The grant will be disbursed in 3 tranches, following the disbursement schedule below. The first tranche of the grant will be disbursed once the project document has been signed. Release of the second and third tranches will be contingent upon:

  • The successful completion of project milestones 2 and 3, respectively
  • The successful monitoring of the above milestones by an UNDEF-designated monitor.
  • The submission of an audited Financial Utilization Report to UNDEF, following milestone 2 and 3, by the Implementing Agency (certified by the external independent auditor identified in the project document) and reflecting the amount spent to date.
  • Expenditure of at least 70% of the previous tranche/s
  • Funds will not be released if the project has any overdue narrative or financial reports of any kind, or if the project has failed to follow the UNDEF visibility guidelines noted in section 9b.

Disbursement table

 

Milestone

Amount

Date

1) Project document signature

84 500 US$

Month 1

2) Recruitment meeting (Output 1.1.3)

35 000 US$

Month 4

3) Start-up Event (Output 3.1.2)

40 500 US$

Month 13

4) Final Report (including certified financial statements)

10% of the grant in US$ (retained by UNDEF for monitoring and evaluation)

Month 25